Technology News

78 Indigenous Languages Are Being Saved By Optical Scanning Tech

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 16:40
Researchers at UC Berkeley are using futuristic technology to save a piece of the past. From a report: Project IRENE is using cutting-edge optical scan technology to transfer and digitally restore recordings of indigenous languages, many of which no longer have living speakers, Hyperallergic first reported. The recordings were gathered between 1900 and 1938 when UC anthropologists asked native speakers of 78 indigenous languages of California to record their songs, histories, prayers, and vocabulary on wax cylinders. Many of those cylinders are housed at Berkeley's Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and they are in a state of disrepair, degraded and broken. It's a frustrating state of affairs, as many of the languages recorded on the cylinders have fallen out of use or are no longer spoken at all. The "Documenting Endangered Languages" initiative, which has support from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, is hoping to save this important history.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Turkey Bans Periscope

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 16:00
stikves writes: According to online reports, a recent court order has banned Periscope across Turkey. The cited reason is the alleged violation of copyrights of a local company named "Periskop." This adds to the list of online services no longer available in Turkey, including Wikipedia, PayPal and WordPress, among others. While access from Turkey to the domain periscope.tv and to the Twitter account "periscopeco" is banned, users can still access Periscope services under the name Scope TR and Twitter account "scopetr." Lawyers from Twitter, Apple and Google requested rejection of the case, "saying it was impossible for a company like Twitter, operating in the U.S., to be aware of the existence of the same brand name in Turkey," reports Stockholm Center for Freedom.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Apple confirms iOS 12's 'USB Restricted Mode' designed to thwart police seizures [u]

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 15:34


Apple on Wednesday acknowledged that iOS 12's incarnation of "USB Restricted Mode" was deliberately built to thwart not just criminals, but searches by spies and police.
Categories: Technology News

'Netflix and Alphabet Will Need To Become ISPs, Fast'

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 15:20
Following the recent official repeal of net neutrality and approval of AT&T's acquisition of Time Warner, an anonymous reader shares an excerpt from a report via TechCrunch, written by Danny Crichton. Crichton discusses the options Alphabet, Netflix and other video streaming services have on how to respond: For Alphabet, that will likely mean a redoubling of its commitment to Google Fiber. That service has been trumpeted since its debut, but has faced cutbacks in recent years in order to scale back its original ambitions. That has meant that cities like Atlanta, which have held out for the promise of cheap and reliable gigabit bandwidth, have been left in something of a lurch. Ultimately, Alphabet's strategic advantage against Comcast, AT&T and other massive ISPs is going to rest on a sort of mutually assured destruction. If Comcast throttles YouTube, then Alphabet can propose launching in a critical (read: lucrative) Comcast market. Further investment in Fiber, Project Fi or perhaps a 5G-centered wireless strategy will be required to give it to the leverage to bring those negotiations to a better outcome. For Netflix, it is going to have to get into the connectivity game one way or the other. Contracts with carriers like Comcast and AT&T are going to be more challenging to negotiate in light of today's ruling and the additional power they have over throttling. Netflix does have some must-see shows, which gives it a bit of leverage, but so do the ISPs. They are going to have to do an end-run around the distributors to give them similar leverage to what Alphabet has up its sleeve. One interesting dynamic I could see forthcoming would be Alphabet creating strategic partnerships with companies like Netflix, Twitch and others to negotiate as a collective against ISPs. While all these services are at some level competitors, they also face an existential threat from these new, vertically merged ISPs. That might be the best of all worlds given the shit sandwich we have all been handed this week.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Spanish Soccer League App In Google Play Wants To Use Phone Mics To Enforce Copyrights

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 14:40
The official app for the Spanish soccer league La Liga, which has more than 10 million downloads from Google Play, was recently updated to seek access to users' microphone and GPS settings. "When granted, the app processes audio snippets in an attempt to identify public venues that broadcast soccer games without a license," reports Ars Technica. From the report: According to a statement issued by La Liga officials, the functionality was added last Friday and is enabled only after users click "eyes" to an Android dialog asking if the app can access the mic and geolocation of the device. The statement says the audio is used solely to identify establishments that broadcast games without a license and that the app takes special precautions to prevent it from spying on end users. [La Liga's full statement with the "appropriate technical measures to protect the user's privacy" is embedded in Ars' report.] [E]ven if the app uses a cryptographic hash or some other means to ensure that stored or transmitted audio fragments can't be abused by company insiders or hackers (a major hypothetical), there are reasons users should reject this permission. For one, allowing an app to collect the IP address, unique app ID, binary representation of audio, and the time that the audio was converted could provide a fair amount of information over time about a user. For another, end users frequenting local bars and restaurants shouldn't be put in the position of policing the copyrights of sports leagues, particularly with an app that uses processed audio from their omnipresent phone.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Volkswagen Fined One Billion Euros By German Prosecutors Over Emissions Cheating

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 14:01
Volkswagen was fined one billion euros ($1.18 billion) over diesel emissions cheating in what amounts to one of the highest ever fines imposed by German authorities against a company, public prosecutors said on Wednesday. From a report: The German fine follows a U.S. plea agreement from January 2017 when VW agreed to pay $4.3 billion to resolve criminal and civil penalties for installing illegal software in diesel engines to cheat strict U.S. anti-pollution tests. "Following thorough examination, Volkswagen AG accepted the fine and it will not lodge an appeal against it. Volkswagen AG, by doing so, admits its responsibility for the diesel crisis and considers this as a further major step toward the latter being overcome," it said in a statement. The fine is the latest blow to Germany's auto industry which cannot seem to catch a break from the diesel emissions crisis. Germany's government on Monday ordered Daimler to recall nearly 240,000 cars fitted with illicit emissions-control devices, part of a total of 774,000 models affected in Europe as a whole.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Britain's Dixons Carphone Discovers Data Breach Affecting 5.9 Million Payment Cards

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 13:20
Mark Wilson shares a report from BetaNews: Another week, another cyberattack. This time around, it's the Dixons Carphone group which says it has fallen victim to not one but two major breaches. The bank card details of 5.9 million customers have been accessed by hackers in the first breach. In the second, the personal records of 1.2 million people have been exposed. Dixons Carphone says that it is investigating an attack on its card processing system at Currys PC World and Dixons Travel in which there was an attempt to compromise 5.9 million cards. The company stressed that the vast majority -- 5.8 million -- of these cards were protected by chip and PIN, and that the data accessed did not include PINS, CVVs or any other authentication data that could be used to make payments or identify the card owners. The report goes on to mention that 105,000 non-EU issued payment cards, which were not chip and PIN protected, were also affected. The company says it will be contacting those customers affected by the breaches.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Laptops With 128GB of RAM Are Here

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 12:40
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Brace yourself for laptops with 128GB of RAM because they're coming. Today, Lenovo announced its ThinkPad P52, which, along with that massive amount of memory, also features up to 6TB of storage, up to a 4K, 15.6-inch display, an eighth-gen Intel hexacore processor, and an Nvidia Quadro P3200 graphics card. The ThinkPad also includes two Thunderbolt three ports, HDMI 2.0, a mini DisplayPort, three USB Type-A ports, a headphone jack, and an Ethernet port. The company hasn't announced pricing yet, but it's likely going to try to compete with Dell's new 128GB-compatible workstation laptops. The Dell workstation laptops in question are the Precision 7730 and 7530, which are billed as "ready for VR" mobile workstations. According to TechRadar, "These again run with either 8th-gen Intel CPUs or Xeon processors, AMD Radeon WX or Nvidia Quadro graphics, and the potential to specify a whopping 128GB of 3200MHz system memory."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

How to watermark PDFs and images using Quick Actions in macOS Mojave

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 12:32


When Apple revealed macOS Mojave at WWDC 2018 last week, the company briefly teased a new ability that allows Mac users to quickly add watermarks to multiple pages within a PDF file, or a batch of images, using the new operating system's Quick Actions feature. Check out how it works before Mojave sees release this fall.
Categories: Technology News

Hundreds of Thousands of Windows XP and Vista Users Won't Be Able To Use Steam Soon

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 12:00
Windows XP and Vista users have six months to upgrade their operating systems or get the hell off of Steam. From a report: "Steam will officially stop supporting the Windows XP and Windows Vista operating systems," Valve, the company that operates Steam, said in a post to its XP and Vista support community. "This means that after that date the Steam Client will no longer run on those versions of Windows. In order to continue running Steam and any games or other products purchased through Steam, users will need to update to a more recent version of Windows."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Apple rolls out second developer beta for watchOS 4.3.2

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 11:36


Apple has made available the second beta of watchOS 4.3.2 to developers for testing, two days after the company released the second betas for iOS 11.4.1, tvOS 11.4.1, and macOS 10.13.6.
Categories: Technology News

Microsoft To Give Office 365, Office.com Apps a Makeover

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 11:20
On the heels of recent redesigns by Google and Apple, Microsoft is giving its Office apps a facelift over the coming months. From a report: Over the coming months, Microsoft will begin rolling out changes to the interface of Outlook, Word, Excel and PowerPoint for Office 365 and Office Online (Office.com) users. Key to the Office app redesign are an updated Ribbon, icon refreshes and new ways to more easily see changes coming to the Office suite. There's a simplified version of the Office Ribbon, which allows users to collapse it so it takes up less space and hides many options, or keep it expanded into the current three-line view. Microsoft is starting to roll out this new Ribbon in the web version of Word to "select consumer users today in Office.com." In July, Microsoft will also make this new Ribbon design available in Outlook for Windows. "We've found that the same ten commands are used 95% of the time by everybody," said Jon Friedman, General Manager of Design Management and Operations. In Outlook such as "Reply," "Reply All" and "Forward" are basically universal. But that other five percent is different for every person, so Microsoft is adding an option to remove commands from the Ribbon, such as Archive, for example, and pin others to it, such as "Reply by IM."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Here are all the big changes to Apple Maps in 2017 and 2018

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 11:00


In a bid to beat Google, Apple is continually updating Apple Maps, bringing in new features and expanding coverage. Here's what the company's been adding over the last year.
Categories: Technology News

Bitcoin's Price Was Artificially Inflated Last Year, Researchers Say

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 10:40
A concentrated campaign of price manipulation may have accounted for at least half of the increase in the price of Bitcoin and other big cryptocurrencies last year, according to a paper released on Wednesday by an academic with a history of spotting fraud in financial markets. From a report, first shared to us by reader davidwr: The paper by John Griffin, a finance professor at the University of Texas, and Amin Shams, a graduate student, is likely to stoke a debate about how much of Bitcoin's skyrocketing gain last year was caused by the covert actions of a few big players, rather than real demand from investors. Many industry players expressed concern at the time that the prices were being pushed up at least partly by activity at Bitfinex, one of the largest and least regulated exchanges in the industry. The exchange, which is registered in the Caribbean with offices in Asia, was subpoenaed by American regulators shortly after articles about the concerns appeared in The New York Times and other publications. Mr. Griffin looked at the flow of digital tokens going in and out of Bitfinex and identified several distinct patterns that suggest that someone or some people at the exchange successfully worked to push up prices when they sagged at other exchanges. To do that, the person or people used a secondary virtual currency, known as Tether, which was created and sold by the owners of Bitfinex, to buy up those other cryptocurrencies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

A Vulnerability in Cortana, Now Patched, Allowed Attacker To Access a Locked Computer, Change Its Password

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 10:00
Catalin Cimpanu, reporting for BleepingComputer: Microsoft has patched a vulnerability in the Cortana smart assistant that could have allowed an attacker with access to a locked computer to use the smart assistant and access data on the device, execute malicious code, or even change the PC's password to access the device in its entirety. The issue was discovered by Cedric Cochin, Cyber Security Architect and Senior Principle Engineer at McAfee. Cochin privately reported the problems he discovered to Microsoft in April. The vulnerability is CVE-2018-8140, which Microsoft classified as an elevation of privilege, and patched yesterday during the company's monthly Patch Tuesday security updates. Further reading: Microsoft Explains How it Decides Whether a Vulnerability Will Be Patched Swiftly or Left For a Version Update.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

The End of Video Coding?

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 09:20
An anonymous reader writes: Netflix's engineering team has an insightful post today that looks at how the industry is handling video coding; the differences in their methodologies; and the challenges new comers face. An excerpt, which sums up where we are: "MPEG-2, VC1, H.263, H.264/AVC, H.265/HEVC, VP9, AV1 -- all of these standards were built on the block-based hybrid video coding structure. Attempts to veer away from this traditional model have been unsuccessful. In some cases (say, distributed video coding), it was because the technology was impractical for the prevalent use case. In most other cases, however, it is likely that not enough resources were invested in the new technology to allow for maturity. "Unfortunately, new techniques are evaluated against the state-of-the-art codec, for which the coding tools have been refined from decades of investment. It is then easy to drop the new technology as "not at-par." Are we missing on better, more effective techniques by not allowing new tools to mature? How many redundant bits can we squeeze out if we simply stay on the paved path and iterate on the same set of encoding tools?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

The Mac gaming landscape remains dire, with no improvements in sight

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 09:10


Apple is in a very strange position with the Mac and iOS in regards to gaming. One platform is enormous and making a ton of money for Apple and some developers, and the other is nearly dead. AppleInsider talks about the two, and what, if anything, is going on to improve the situation.
Categories: Technology News

Owners of Apple Watch Series 3 with LTE now have more US carrier choices

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 08:54


People who own or plan to buy an LTE-equipped Apple Watch Series 3 now have the option of two of the bigger regional U.S. carriers, and aren't just stuck with the so-called big four anymore.
Categories: Technology News

Microsoft Explains How it Decides Whether a Vulnerability Will Be Patched Swiftly or Left For a Version Update

Slashdot - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 08:39
Microsoft has published a new draft document clarifying which security bugs will get a rapid fix and which it will let stew for a later release. From a report: The document outlines the criteria the Microsoft Security Response Center uses to decide whether a reported vulnerability gets fixed swiftly, usually in a Patch Tuesday security update, or left for a later version update. Microsoft said in a blogpost the document is intended to offer researchers "better clarity around the security features, boundaries and mitigations which exist in Windows and the servicing commitments which come with them." The criteria revolve around two key questions: "Does the vulnerability violate a promise made by a security boundary or a security feature that Microsoft has committed to defending?"; and, "Does the severity of the vulnerability meet the bar for servicing?" If the answer to both questions is 'yes', the bug will be patched in a security update, but if the answer to both is 'no', the vulnerability will be considered for the next version or release of the affected product or feature.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Tim Cook talks about Steve Jobs thinking differently, Apple product philosophy

Apple Insider - Wed, 06/13/2018 - 08:02


Apple CEO Tim Cook praised co-founder Steve Jobs in a recent interview for Bloomberg, including his vision for how the iPhone producer should be operated and Cook's interactions with him, as well as covering the company's views on subjects like privacy and civil liberties.
Categories: Technology News

Pages

Subscribe to Bill's Place aggregator - Technology News