Technology News

Apple pulls iOS 12 beta 7 OTA update amid performance woes

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 15:33


The latest iOS 12 beta 7 over-the-air update has been made temporarily unavailable as Apple investigates reports of unexpected performance issues associated with the release.
Categories: Technology News

Facebook Bans the Sale of All Kodi Boxes

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 15:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TorrentFreak: Facebook previously banned the sale of fully-loaded pirate streaming devices, as did Amazon and eBay, but the social network appears to have expanded this to all Kodi-powered hardware now. This is made clear in the prohibited content section of the company's commerce policies, as shown below. Facebook states that users are no longer allowed to promote "the sale or use of streaming devices with KODI installed." In addition, jailbroken or loaded devices are also banned from the platform. The issue was first noticed by CordCuttersNews which notes that sellers who violate the policy may have their Facebook accounts banned. Interestingly, Facebook will still permit the sale of "add-on equipment for KODI devices," including keyboards and remotes. However, selling any devices with the software itself is no longer allowed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Google apps continue to track users even if location services are disabled

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 15:02


Google's services will attempt to monitor the movements of a user's device even if the user disables location services, with some Android and iOS apps produced by the search giant allegedly recording location data without the user's knowledge, an investigation into the feature claims.
Categories: Technology News

Internet Engineering Task Force Releases the Final Version of TLS 1.3; Newest Chrome and Firefox Versions Already Support a Draft Version of It

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 14:50
The encryption that protects your browser's connection to websites is getting a notch faster and a notch safer to use. From a report: That's because the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) on Friday finished a years-long process of modernizing the technology used to secure website communications. You may never have heard of Transport Layer Security -- TLS for short -- but version 1.3 is now complete and headed to websites, browsers and other parts of the internet that rely on its security. "Publishing TLS 1.3 is a huge accomplishment. It is one the best recent examples of how it is possible to take 20 years of deployed legacy code and change it on the fly, resulting in a better internet for everyone," said Nick Sullivan, head of cryptography for Cloudflare, which helps customers distribute their websites and other content around the world, in a blog post. TLS 1.3 brings some significant improvements over TLS 1.2, which was finished 10 years ago. Perhaps first on the list is that it'll mean websites load faster. Setting up an encrypted connection on the web historically has caused delays since your browser and the website server must send information back and forth in a process called a handshake. The slower your broadband or the more congested your mobile network is, the more you'll notice these delays. Firefox and Chrome already support a draft version of TLS 1.3.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Here are all of the Apple retail store openings, moves, and remodels in 2018

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 14:25


With few setbacks, Apple is almost continuously expanding and updating its global retail chain, now over 500 locations. Here's the company's evolution in 2018 so far, updated on Aug. 14 with news on this weekend's reopenings in California and Illinois.
Categories: Technology News

Apple Asked Developers To Adopt Subscriptions and Hike App Prices, Report Says

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 14:10
Apple invited a group of app developers to a secret April 2017 meeting in New York's Tribeca district, asking them to move from selling apps at low prices to renting app access through subscriptions, Business Insider reports. From a story: This change is intended to keep users paying for apps "on a regular basis, putting money into developer coffers on a regular schedule," the report claims.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

All three 2018 iPhones to support wireless charging, AirPower mat to cost $150, rumors say

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 13:47


As predicted Apple's 5.8-, 6.1-, and 6.5-inch iPhones shipping this fall should all offer wireless charging, and the company's long-delayed AirPower mat should finally ship around the same time for $150, reports claim.
Categories: Technology News

IBM Promised Its AI Platform Watson Would Be a Big Step Forward in Treating Cancer. But After Pouring Billions Into the Project, the Diagnosis is Gloomy.

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 13:30
Can Watson cure cancer? That's what IBM asked soon after its AI system beat humans at the quiz show "Jeopardy!" in 2011. Watson could read documents quickly and find patterns in data. Could it match patient information with the latest in medical studies to deliver personalized treatment recommendations? "Watson represents a technology breakthrough that can help physicians improve patient outcomes," said Herbert Chase, a professor of biomedical informatics at Columbia University, in a 2012 IBM press release. Six years and billions of dollars later, the diagnosis for Watson is gloomy [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; alternative source]. WSJ: More than a dozen IBM partners and clients have halted or shrunk Watson's oncology-related projects. Watson cancer applications have had limited impact on patients, according to dozens of interviews with medical centers, companies and doctors who have used it, as well as documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. In many cases, the tools didn't add much value. In some cases, Watson wasn't accurate. Watson can be tripped up by a lack of data in rare or recurring cancers, and treatments are evolving faster than Watson's human trainers can update the system. Dr. Chase of Columbia said he withdrew as an adviser after he grew disappointed in IBM's direction for marketing the technology. No published research shows Watson improving patient outcomes. IBM said Watson has important cancer-care benefits, like helping doctors keep up with medical knowledge.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Hands on: Audio-Technica's gesture-controlled, noise-cancelling ATH-ANC700BT headphones

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 13:09


One of the year's more notable entries into the realm of high-fidelity Bluetooth headphones comes from Audio-Technica, which is trying to bridge the gap between performance and cost with its $199 QuietPoint ATH-ANC700BT, or the 700BT for short.
Categories: Technology News

Hacked Water Heaters Could Trigger Mass Blackouts Someday

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:50
At the Usenix Security conference this week, a group of Princeton University security researchers will present a study that considers a little-examined question in power grid cybersecurity: What if hackers attacked not the supply side of the power grid, but the demand side? From a report: In a series of simulations, the researchers imagined what might happen if hackers controlled a botnet composed of thousands of silently hacked consumer internet of things devices, particularly power-hungry ones like air conditioners, water heaters, and space heaters. Then they ran a series of software simulations to see how many of those devices an attacker would need to simultaneously hijack to disrupt the stability of the power grid. Their answers point to a disturbing, if not quite yet practical scenario: In a power network large enough to serve an area of 38 million people -- a population roughly equal to Canada or California -- the researchers estimate that just a one percent bump in demand might be enough to take down the majority of the grid. That demand increase could be created by a botnet as small as a few tens of thousands of hacked electric water heaters or a couple hundred thousand air conditioners. "Power grids are stable as long as supply is equal to demand," says Saleh Soltan, a researcher in Princeton's Department of Electrical Engineering, who led the study. "If you have a very large botnet of IoT devices, you can really manipulate the demand, changing it abruptly, any time you want."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

How to replace Apple Mail on the Mac, and why you might want to switch

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:26


Look beyond the standard email app to get more power features like converting messages into To Do tasks or calendar appointments. AppleInsider checks out the reasons to leave Apple Mail -- and the reasons to stay.
Categories: Technology News

US House Candidates Vulnerable To Hacks, Researchers Say

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 12:10
About 30 percent of House candidates running for office this year have significant cybersecurity issues with their campaign websites, according to a new study. Reuters: The research was unveiled on Sunday at the annual Def Con security conference in Las Vegas, where some attendees have spent three days hacking into voting machines to highlight vulnerabilities in technology running polling operations. A team of four independent researchers led by former National Institutes for Standards and Technology security expert Joshua Franklin concluded that the websites of nearly one-third of U.S. House candidates, Democrats and Republicans alike, are vulnerable to attacks. NIST is a U.S. Commerce Department laboratory that provides advice on technical issues, including cyber security. Using automated scans and test programs, the team identified multiple vulnerabilities, including problems with digital certificates used to verify secure connections with users, Franklin told Reuters ahead of the presentation. The warnings about the midterm elections, which are less than three months away, come after Democrats have spent more than a year working to bolster cyber defenses of the party's national, state and campaign operations.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

The Mining Town Where People Live Under the Earth

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 11:30
Claire Reilly, writing for CNET: After spending a night in an underground rock cave in the middle of the Australian desert, I learned three things: The silence is deafening. Your eyes never adjust to the darkness. And if nobody brushes the ceiling before you arrive, that clump of dirt is going to scare the living hell out of you when it drops on your face at 2 a.m. I've flown 1,200 miles for the privilege of sleeping in a hole in Coober Pedy. There's no Wi-Fi down here. The glare of my MacBook feels obnoxious in the subterranean stillness. The TV plays ads for a "local" cleaning service from the next town over, but that just happens to be 400 miles away. Australia is a country defined by "the tyranny of distance," but traveling to the underground opal mining town of Coober Pedy feels like taking a holiday on Mars. In the middle of the South Australian desert and an eight hour drive in either direction from the nearest capital city (Adelaide to the south or Alice Springs to the north), Coober Pedy is off the grid and mostly hidden underground. More than half the residents live buried in the bedrock in cavelike homes called "dugouts" in order to escape freezing winters, scorching summers and the occasional cyclone. Often, the only sign you're walking on someone's roof is the air vent that's sprouted up next to your boots. While first nation peoples have lived in the central Australian desert for thousands of years, the Coober Pedy we know today wouldn't exist without opals. Miners rushed here in the 1920s, enduring extreme conditions to hunt for the multicolored gems, digging, bulldozing and eventually blasting out earth in a bid to find the elusive seam that would make them rich. Living in Coober Pedy is not just about surviving. It's about carving out a way of life in one of the harshest environments on the planet. [...] "It's not like we're living thousands of kilometers under the ground," he tells me. "It's pretty similar to living in a normal house." Sam's family, who live in a dugout close to Crocodile Harry's, have solar panels for power -- but those generate only enough electricity for a few hours a day. Diesel handles the rest, he says. "We have to rely on tourists to pay for our fuel," he says. "Gasoline is valuable out here. Fuel is really expensive." That means no fridge running all day and night -- they keep nonperishable food and get the rest from town every day. Otherwise, life is pretty similar to what other 18-year-olds in the city experience. Sam says he can still charge his phone and use the TV "for a bit." "We have internet when the generator's on. Dad's got an Xbox but we don't even try to use the solar for that."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Group FaceTime won't be available for initial iOS 12 or macOS Mojave release

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 11:26


Apple's Group FaceTime feature apparently isn't ready for prime time, and won't be available to the general public when iOS 12 is made available to customers in the fall.
Categories: Technology News

Apple issues seventh developer betas for iOS 12, macOS 10.14 Mojave, tvOS 12, watchOS 5

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 11:08


Apple has started to distribute the seventh betas of its milestone operating systems to developers for testing, with new builds of macOS Mojave, iOS 12, tvOS 12, and watchOS 5 made available just a week after the last batch.
Categories: Technology News

Foxconn taking charge of vast majority of iPhone production this fall

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 10:51


Foxconn will not only manufacture every second-generation, 5.8-inch OLED iPhone -- sometimes dubbed the "iPhone XS" -- but 90 percent of 6.5-inch "XS Plus" units, and 75 percent of a 6.1-inch LCD budget model, according to one research firm.
Categories: Technology News

Malicious Faxes Leave Firms 'Open' To Cyber-Attack

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 10:40
Booby-trapped image data sent by fax can let malicious hackers sneak into corporate networks, security researchers have found. From a report: Since many companies use fax machines that are also printers and photocopiers, they often have a connection to the internal network. The malicious images exploit protocols established in the 1980s that define the format of fax messages. The research was presented at the Def Con hacker conference in Las Vegas. The two researchers said millions of companies could be at risk because they currently did little to secure fax lines. "Fax has no security measures built in -- absolutely nothing," security researcher Yaniv Balmas, from Check Point software, told the BBC. Mr Balmas uncovered the security holes in the fax protocols with the help of colleague Eyal Itkin and said they were "surprised" by the extent to which fax was still used.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

'Synthetic Click' attack re-emerges in macOS High Sierra at Defcon

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 10:28


A vulnerability has been discovered in macOS that could allow an attacker to impersonate a mouse click, enabling for it to bypass security prompts and completely compromise a Mac, a flaw that was found by accident.
Categories: Technology News

Review: Hue Lily multi-color spotlights bring HomeKit to the outdoors

Apple Insider - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 10:09


Hue has become the most popular indoor smart light, and now they have evolved to tackle the outdoors as well. Hue Lily is one of many new outdoor bulbs and fixtures from Signify, marking the first official outdoor HomeKit lights.
Categories: Technology News

The Flourishing Business of Fake YouTube Views

Slashdot - Mon, 08/13/2018 - 10:05
An anonymous reader shares a report: Martin Vassilev makes a good living selling fake views on YouTube videos. Working from home in Ottawa, he has sold about 15 million views so far this year, putting him on track to bring in more than $200,000, records show. Mr. Vassilev, 32, does not provide the views himself. His website, 500Views.com, connects customers with services that offer views, likes and dislikes generated by computers, not humans. When a supplier cannot fulfill an order, Mr. Vassilev -- like a modern switchboard operator -- quickly connects with another. "I can deliver an unlimited amount of views to a video," Mr. Vassilev said in an interview. "They've tried to stop it for so many years, but they can't stop it. There's always a way around." [...] Just as other social media companies have been plagued by impostor accounts and artificial influence campaigns, YouTube has struggled with fake views for years. The fake-view ecosystem of which Mr. Vassilev is a part can undermine YouTube's credibility by manipulating the digital currency that signals value to users. While YouTube says fake views represent just a tiny fraction of the total, they still have a significant effect by misleading consumers and advertisers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Technology News

Pages

Subscribe to Bill's Place aggregator - Technology News